Living Minimalist

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Do you know that one in four people have a clutter problem! the research

conducted in US confirms the above statement. The biggest trends in home

decor these days is not just a design style, but an entire lifestyle change

— a growing movement called minimalism or minimalist living. 

What It’s Like to Be a Minimalist:

It has its roots in Buddhism and was first coined in the mid-’60s by a

British art theorist, according to Kyle Chayka, author of The Longing for

Less: Living with Minimalism. If you’re wondering more about how to

incorporate it into your own home, here’s everything to know about minimalist

living.

What is Minimalist Living?

 

Though minimalism can be defined in many different ways, there’s typically

one common unifying theme to the movement: a philosophy of living simply or

living with less. A minimalist home is very intentional, each possession is

there for a reason. As such, minimalist living typically involves declutteringorganizing, and “minimizing” your home — all to lead a simpler, more purposeful lifestyle. 

Benefits of Minimalist Living:

 

  • More money. Fewer items in your home mean more money, as you’ll be

          buying less and taking care of less. 

  • More time. If you live with fewer items in your home, you’ll spend

    less time cleaning and organizing (and shopping), therefore allowing
    you to have more time available in your day to engage in what matters most to you. 

  • Good for the environment. By buying less and using less, you’ll

    also be reducing your consumption of the planet’s natural resources
    — therefore doing your part to help out the environment!

 

Tips for Minimalist Living:

If you’re ready to reap all the great benefits of this simple and

purposeful lifestyle, here’s how to create a minimalist home and start

living more minimally: 

Focus on one room at a time. 

 Direct your time and energy into the easiest room first — then use

that as inspiration for the others as you go through the rest of your house. 

Start with the visible areas first.

Once you’ve chosen a room to focus on, a good approach is to start with

the visible areas first — so things like shelves, furniture, and things

on the floor — before moving onto the hidden areas in the room, like 

organizing your drawers, cabinets, and the closet. This way could help

immensely when you feel overwhelmed by the number of items you have to

go through. 

Declutter by keeping only the essentials.

When it’s time to start decluttering, a good rule of thumb is to

keep only the items that are truly essential — and meaningful — to you. 

If you’re still having trouble deciding to keep or toss something,

ask yourself following specific questions about the particular item:

  1. Do I need it?
  2. Do I use it?
  3. What would I use if I didn’t have it?
  4. Why do I have it? 
  5. Limit your decorations to meaningful items.


Tidy up regularly. 

It’s one thing to effectively transform your home to a minimalist one

 but it’s another to keep it that way for good! Your home is a space

that’s continuously being lived in, so things will inevitably start

to get messy after a while; that’s why it’s important to have good

cleaning habits going forward.

Resist the temptation to buy more.

It can be especially hard to buy fewer things in an age of constant

and pervasive advertising — This can also mean rejecting materialism

to focus more on the items that are meaningful to you. “Think about

what are the things that you like, versus what are the things that

like materialism or advertising has caused you to like.

Find your purpose.

The goal of minimalism isn’t just to own less stuff, but to live a

more meaningful life than the one I’m living.